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traditional and xenophobic society in remote rural villages with only landlocked mountainous environment with a population density very low the connectivity is almost nonexistent. if you look to the future of the plan at what will happen after afghanistan is over and we move to the next round of conflict you will find that is not it at all but much more on the urban coastal and very highly connected environment. we will do a lot of the same things we have done. 80% of conflict is and always has been a regular in nature one of the main combatants is almost the non armed group more precisely with u.s. military history there is a specific repeated patent that we do a barge scale operation about once every 20 or 25 years also the size of kosovo about every five or 10 years and that pattern goes right back to the middle of the 19th century and it is completely independent of policy makers preferences. somebody say to the president say we would get out of this business? he is the seventh president to say the same statement over 80 years and there is no effect whether he wants to do it or not o
and grandparents, is who i am. i'm a product of my environment. we grew up in an area that we had tracks, the railroad tracks ran where the coal came out of the mines. we had a buffalo creek. all those little kids living between that, every time a train came, my grandmother went insane. what she did not know is we would ride the train up to town. it would drive her crazy. that is what the train provided. the lead was for -- the coal that fell off, a lot of people heated their homes. it was what we lived with. my grandmother was the most kind, compassionate. if anybody needed a place to stay, you go to mama kay. she made us conscious of our social responsibilities. she had a shower and a little bathroom in the basement. not much. she shared. we had all the different people who would ride the rails in the 1950's. a lot of people would ride the rails. we had names for every body. we hadpeggy, nicknames for all of them. >> what was your nickname? >> we had nicknames for people who would stay. she had three rules. they had to be sober. you have to stay sober. mama would do anything, i will fe
the team because he felt his safety was at risk if he stayed in this workplace environment. >> this is a 6, 5, 330 pound man. but again, he really felt like some guys on this team were out to get him and some of the things they had made said or threatened may actually occur. and this was the only way he felt like coextricate himself from the situation and that perhaps it gets corrected. >> jeff: rookie hazing takes place in the nfl all the time. have you ever seen a case like this? >> not of a player leaving a team and basically forcing its team's hand, how do we deal with this on our roster wa, do we do in this regard. everything that i've been told is that this goes above and beyond the norm. but those norms are different. the culture of an nfl locker room it is not your normal workplace environment. an i think some players maybe tolerate more than others. i think there is a lot that we don't know that goes unsaid because it's part of the code. but there is an instance of a young man, educated, standford kid who has been around the football environment and this was pushing him to a degre
in a mediated environment. we need people to tell us whether the information we are leaking is important to not, whether it is private or not. no one wants their e-mail read if it is not done legally but -- >> even if it is. >> probably right. >> other aspects of this make it so hard. particularly in the information sharing bucket where we are trying to figure out what information can or should be shared. getting a base line of what the information is, what it is is very difficult in a technophobia world. >> i have trouble seeing you. do you have anything to add on the privacy issue and legal concerns that have been raised? >> where you started was i have something to contribute to this debate. i hope it is a point of this audience will appreciate. my title is associate general counsel, not director of strategy and policy so people in think tanks can debate the subjects, our role is trying to help with legal ways to move forward. in terms of privacy protection and information sharing the information sharing cornerstone of it has got to the trust and confidence in one another so privacy protecti
, privacy concerns, and so you are necessarily dealing with an environment in which you are trying to, as someone who was dealing with cyber security gain access to protective data. we need to get this information to determine whether something's happening, but it is, in some ways, by the force of law made more complex. the complexity is then, something dan was talking about there for a moment, this information sharing cuts across different entities, so you have sharing that has to happen among private entities, by and large the constraints that people speak of in that area largely think with appty trust concerns; although, i have to say we have difficulty talking to in identifying exactly what antitrust concerns may be when they are actually sharing cyber threat information which is what we are really talking about. them, of course, you have sharing from the u.s. government to the private sector, and that's something that, you know, dan was speaking to, a lot of product is going out to the private sector in order to help them better protect their own network, and then there is the ef
, you have to look at the environment, mal pesticides. >> from her farm koby gathers male sperm from drones that can survive harsh conditions and will inseminate queens showing resistance to pests. fitness. >> the process is quick. it does take a lot of squeezing to get enough sperm for insemination. >> i'll role the fingers. >> that's the semen. >> you can see the >> it placed in a tube. >> how much will you give her. >> one turn, 10 microlitres. basically 10 drones worth. the goal is to have - i want gentle productive bee, but bees resistent to pests and problems we have, which is a tall order. i'll spend the rest of my life trying to do that. >> koby is not alone. in paulman washington, members of her team are breeding the >> >> what are these? >> voucher specimens. this is egypt collected in 1998, and bees from australia. >> for years they've gathered diverse stocks of bee sperm from italy, turkey and the kauk cos mountains to build diversity. >> this is the isolated mating station. we use it to control the mating of the bees. the colonies that have the males that we want for the
this be a great productive work environment, but there are certain things that are out of control that dramatically impact jobs in tennessee. when i hear manufacturers tell us, we love being in tennessee and we love the work environment, but if we had this agreement in place, we could produce x more jobs. it is frustrating to me as a governor because it is something that is out of my control, but it is critical for me to lend that voice, whether it is in washington or anywhere else, to raise it. we have worked hard to set up a great working environment in tennessee. we think we have it. there are certain things that are beyond our control. >> so i understand everyone on this panel is an enthusiast to these agreements, but we want to be clearheaded about some of the competitive costs. in the construction-mining business, what you see as the competitiveness that would come from -- imports would be less expensive? what are the challenges you will face of some of these deals come to be? >> well, that is a great question, and one we are battling on many fronts, and it comes back to the
that degrade the environment. and yet, the democrats cannot move their agenda. >> well, remember the debate over the health care bill, what is now called obama care. the overwhelming majority of the democrats in both the house and the senate wanted a public option. they wanted some kind of medicare for all. and it was only a handful of democrats, the corporate democrats led by max baucus. >> from montana. >> yes. >> who was chairman of the banking and finance committee. >> that's right. so, a small group of democrats, the corporate democrats were able to thwart the public will and have a public option. so, i don't think you can blame the entire democratic party. it is true that big business has an important role to play in the democratic party. and i think that's why we got robert rubin and we got tim geithner and we got the kinds of people that have. >> clinton democrats? >> the clinton democrats. and i think that's why obama picked, i think, the wrong people to be his financial advisors when he came into office. >> but there are with all due respect very few signs of leadership on a progr
. he said it's necessary because the security environment in asia is getting more severe. lawmakers on a parliamentary committee are taking a closer look at the bill. the prime minister wants to build a body that's similar to the u.s. national security council. he would chair meetings and his foreign and defense ministers would take part, along with the chief cabinet secretary. the national security office would be created within the cabinet secretariat at the same time. the chief cabinet secretary spoke during the meeting. he urged lawmakers to get the bill enacted as soon as possible. >> translator: the security environment surrounding japan is increasingly unstable. regular forums involving the prime minister discussing the security issues are vital. this will allow the prime minister to take strong leadership in the field of national security. >> suga said the head of the national security office would be in charge of the administrative affairs. the national security council would advise the prime minister directly. he added, the posts could be filled by individuals from the pub
environment. she's a fabulous partner and i am thrilled by it. i'm very happy to have her there. i heard written introduction -- her in the introduction. we had a chance to go out and break bread together. she reminded me of the story of her dad who started a family business with one motel out in los angeles. she went on to spansion cisco and it grew to six and now everyone knows -- san francisco and it grew to six and everyone knows the hyatt. andre so proud of penny glad she's stepping back from the private sector to give us the energy and dynamics that we need. her leadership of select usa is one of the reasons that this effort has the potential to grow our country and to grow all of yours for those of you who are here and visiting from so many other countries. we welcome you here. this in the biggest reason select usa will make a difference is frankly, all of you. a group of very capable business leaders, people who are hungry, who understand the dynamics of the marketplace and to our ambitious and come here with a vision for nearly 60 countries around the world and from all across t
't think i was attempting to make a political point. i think i was trying to describe the environment that i found myself in. i am a pastor first and foremost. i'm not a politician. i am descriptive rather than prescriptive. so what i was describing was phenomena that i saw on both sides of the ilse. i think, for instance, i made a statement, remove the burdens of those who are the collateral damage of this federal shutdown. most of my members were furloughed. i'm aware of the burdens that they have to bear. made a plea for there not to be a delay in death benefits to the grieving families of our fallen warriors. i did that primarily because i have made scores of death notifications to next of kin as a navy chaplain for 27 years and i appreciate the incomprehensible nature of their grief. so i was praying out of past torlksh rather than trying to make a political point. >> did you feel as though you were giving a voice to some of the those people who were furloughed or for military families then? >> i think a critical part of prayer is to lift to god the concerns and the noods of the
started please welcome a great leader and the director of the environment ms. melanie (clapping). >> good morning, everyone. my name is melanie i'm the director of the san francisco department of the environment. i want to thank you all for helping us celebrate electric vehicles in san francisco. before i introduce the mayor i want to introduce other activities. also wanted to thank you for your leadership moreen in helping to adopt the electrician of electric vehicles. so in san francisco we know that transportation is responsible for the second highest attribute for to our green e mediation in the city that comes from cars and trucks. we know if we are going to meet our ambitious climate goals we've got to think about alternatives in gasoline powered vehicles. your greenhouse gas e mediation will be lessen counting the e mediation from power plants. but the good news is in san francisco you can drive a car cleaner than anywhere in the u.s. we're nearly 20 percent renot to my knowledgeable and california will be 33 percent less. you'll be driving particle carbon free from the city hiding
into society, you still need that structured environment, you know, to regain your own empowered self and identify what's goin' on in your life and how you can move forward. it's really about trying to find what's going to work for you in that process of incarceration. so, you know, incarceration is something that touches a lot of people's lives. a lot of families have somebody that's incarcerated. absolutely. how did you determine that you wanted to become a peer support person? during my incarceration, i started taking some self-help groups. and once i started taking the self-help groups, you know, looking around at the room, i said, you know, i wanted to become one of the facilitators of the groups because i still needed some more time myself in the groups, also. so, i became a facilitator, and next thing i knew i was in a therapeutic community, also facilitating in the therapeutic community. and just being able to assist the counselors and the therapists during that process, i felt that was something that i wanted to do. it engaged you. once i was on the streets, yes. very good. m
in the area of east los angeles california in 1982 in an environment that value as quick fix over education and learning, a new teacher at garfield high school. that's wikipedia. here is rand paul. >> in the area of east l.a., in 1982, in an environment thatle have as a quick fix on education over learning, he was a new math teacher at garfield high school. >> rand paul is just reading wikipedia and passing it off as if it is his open words. wikipedia entry continues. as the year progresses, he is able to win over the attention of the students by implementing innovative teaching techniques, able to transform even the most troublesome teens in to dedicated students. hit it, senator paul. >> as the year progressed, he was able to win over the attention of students by implementing innovative teaching techniques. he transformed even some of the most troublesome teens in to dedicated students. >> and wedding bells were rippinging tuesday at the supreme court. former just tip is an take day o'connor owe fesh yofficiated te same sex wedding. and that is this morning's dish of scrambled politics. >
particularly challenging in the environment. in that case, it is very much an president. >> the pressure on you to succeed is huge. >> that pressure doesn't compare to when you're preparing to go into the chemical weapons environment, i assure you. >> mid-2014, the chemical arsenal stockpiled must be destroyed. what is your biggest worry about that? >> it is challenging. with the development of the goodwill the international community and all associated actors within this activity, we have demonstrated we can meet the deadlines that have been submitted. i believe this activity will progress and move forward and we will meet any devon required. >> opcw head of operations in syria. our foreign affairs correspondent explains how these chemical buttons are destroyed. opcw inspectors have been in syria since october 1, and their initial mission was to identify and oversee the destruction of equipment critical for mixing and using chemical weapons. one day before the deadline, they've announced a completion. the group has inspected 21 of 23 sites that were disclosed by the syr
francisco a city that celebs education and health care and the environment for our future generations (clapping) >> (speaking spanish.) >> (clapping). >> thank you. i had no idea what you that but it sounded pretty good. everyone welcome to the city hall our people's hall in san francisco. and i am here to join i in celebrated latino heritage month. i want to thank a number of dignitaries that i know who have worked with me. we have the council general of japan and the mongol council and counsel generalizes representing nick away wag and others countries our friends (clapping) >> i see our colleagues on the board president chiu. thank you david chu for being here (clapping) i might not see them immediately but i know that supervisor john avalos and george will be here shortly. and then i also see jeff our public defenders public defender for being here that you are ladies and gentlemen, we're also very rich with latino leaders in our department and to name some of them on behalf of the whole city people like lou our librarian and our director of public health and rich the superint
, and they'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. lou: you remember the "cash for clunkers" stimulus program, a new report on that program, shows that was a lemon according to brookings instruction, the program approved in 2009, did very little to help the environment. it cut gas consum contion by at, what we consume in 8 days, and cost for job created, came in at staggering $1.4 million per job. turning to the food stamp program, nearly 48 million americans who receive food stamps are set to see a cut in their benefits beginning tomorrow. those cuts amount to 6% of $ 80 billion damage, that means a family of 4 will receive abouts there are lik$36 less each mont. >> our next guest has been a combat surgeon who served in iraq, his constituent in ohio till him either their insurance rating are going higher or their policies are being canceled, contrary to what the had the is saying, joining us congressman brad wenstrup. he also serves on the house armied services committee, congressman great to have you with us, one of the impa
. >> which is not what it is in the criminal environment. >> exactly. in the criminal environment it's beyond a reasonable doubt which is somewhere up in the 90s, so there is a vast difference between the two, and essentially universities are making decisions on a .01 margin of error. >> it's 50% plus a little bit that we believe? >> yes. >> and is this an established principal of a federal guideline or up to an individual university? >> it was mandated in 2011 by the office for civil rights at the department of education, and they decreed that in sexual assault cases the proper standard was preponderance of the evidence, and the problem is if universities don't follow the director, they stand the funding. >> so by this you refer to 9. >> yes. >> and we have reported on title 9 as well. title 9 guarantees them a safe, secure, protected environment by the universities, and from their point of view, universities should lose their funding if they are not protecting women equally. >> absolutely. universities have a very important role to play in this. they need to be educating students. they need
. but it is a target-rich environment. and one of a million passengers can act out and you have to respond to it. >> chief parks, who exactly do airport police report to? are they part of the lapd? you said they had separate training. >> caller: by charter, they are the responsibility for the l.a. airport commission. so within the organization of the l.a. airport, you have -- in fact their homeland security was just recently selected to go into a very high level job within lapd. we just came from lapd as deputy chief. they work specifically for the airport. >> are you aware of any kind of tension between tsa officer and airport police at l.a.x.? >> caller: the tsa officer? i'm not aware of that. my understanding is there are thousands of employees and millions of passengers. i'm sure there's a conflict here or there. but i don't have a sense that there's not a very good working relationship amongst the public safety and homeland security people. >> law enforcement source tells cnn before the repositioning, airport police officers complained to the union about being board with the assignment of b
strong protections for workers and consumers and the environment. while we are talking about markets, we are looking at the biggest marketing world. some people try to grab it. imagine this. the market that created the great wealth of the united states in which every single income earners saw the income go up in the 1990s and created unprecedented wealth, more wealth than what was ever created, much more wealth created in the 1990s. that was a $1 trillion market. the global energy market is a $6 trillion market. it will climb to some where around 6 billion or more users. this is the most incredible market ever and the solution to climate change. we will fight to stay at the forefront of this energy market. we will recognize that it has the benefits of climate change as well as the marketplace. we will develop clean technologies that will empower the world and protect our environment at the same time. we are on pace to become the largest oil reducer by 2020. the largest oil producer in the world. that gives us the promise of alternative fuels come including shale gas. we will become fully
of negotiations. and w.t.o. frame work, w.t.o. regulations is exactly what creates an environment that is understandable, known by all potential investors and trading morns importance in russia. more, we are rising the first gative benefits, the membership the first case. but it is normal. trading environment, trading disputes need to be resolved through a normal mechanism that are there and created by all of us to work in the economic field together. i would like to say that the arguments from russia are unknown in terms of economic environment. we are a normal country, we have a market economy. we have yet to further mature. it is something we are working on each and every day. token, we would like to see more from the russian government being represented here, and working in american government. some of them are here. some of them are more less successful, but not many russian markets. some of them, both russian side and american side, when you ask them why they are not russian in these huge markets, they say, i don't want to really see political rellses -- and there is a kind
actually fell just over 10%. they had a weak sales environment. they actually cite the slump in the recent housing sector slump that we've been seeing, and they slashed their outlook going forward, and that's sending the shares of lowe's down 1.2%. but we're also seeing lumber liquidators down and home depot as well as i noted. so a lot of down arrows in anything home-related. back to you. dagen: if you're not happy with your job right now, maybe you should just give it some time, like several years. according to a new sur -- survey from the associated press, nine out of ten workers who are 50 or older say they are very or somewhat happy with their jobs. older workers generally have climbed the career ladder and reached a place in their jobs where they have greater job security, maybe authority even. many older workers say they remain on the job instead of retiring was they enjoy -- because they enjoy that they do. connell: less clear, by the way, in this video whether those people are over 50 or not. dagen: clearly late 80s. connell: nine out of ten people -- makes sense, people more esta
if you go after one you go after all, the people who provided that environment. >> i wrote a book called sell out, in 2009, about how -- listen, bubbles are not created by wall street, they are incentives that wall street is -- one of those incentives, prodding the barges to make the loans. neil: the flip side, those folks saying that jamie dimon could have said no. >> i think what hank paulson calls you in the room,. neil: former treasury secretary. >> tim geithner, the top regulator of the banks, when that comes in, you -- they say we would like you to do it, do you it. neil: the goal to me is paying fannie anything, that is what -- >> it is bogus, and absurd. it is so upsetting, the irony, 5 years after the financial crisis, fannie and freddie that helped cause this official crisis, they are getting money from one of the banks, j.p. morgan, which avoided a financial crisis, not saying they are perfect but in terms of risk management they were the best, one of the banks that caused financial crisis citigroup, was a place where jack lew worked. collected $8 million check before he becam
'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec-d®. powerful relief of nasal congestion and other allergy symptoms -- all in one pill. zyrtec-d®. at the pharmacy counter. it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management. >>> welcome back. 23 minutes past the hour. >>> it is "money time." christine romans is here. >> good morning, you guys. it is world's most valuable company is apple and something for people not to like is its latest earnings report. look at that after hours dip. the mixed feelings could be seen after the close with apple saying and rebounding when the cfo said on the conference call that margins would have been better if not for an accounting change. stock down just a little bit. we will watch this and see what happens w
is the cheap money. the low interest rate environment spurred investors to borrow more on margin, we can see it in the numbers. it's showing that. this is increasing as we see the highs. we've been on the bottom since 2009, and stocks have been growing, which is good. it may be getting ahead of itself. we may be facing a correction. >> yes, but what if the fed cuts back on the cheap money that you are talking about? does the bottom fall out of the markets? >> nobody can say for sure. that's the scenario throughout time. ironically we are celebrating the 84th anniversary of the 1929 stock market crash. there are lessons to be learnt. when we see a build-up of people borrowing money, it gets to an infor example point where it can't continue and we see a steep sell-off. that could be where we are headed. >> we have good earnings reports recently. you see the sort of contradiction where consumers say, "i'm bes mistic about the economy, but investors see the markets going up and up. is there a contradiction. is there a problem with that? >> there really is, because it's floating on hot air. if w
that they were consuming, the environment they were living in, and it was truly a binge drinking environment. they were very open about, and that does give leeway to an occasion where people can be vulnerable. but they are going to be vulnerable on both sides of that equation. the men and the women as well. both sides if you have been subjected to a great deal of intoxication are going to be vulnerable to very unfortunate conclusions. >> yeah, i have seen numbers that as many as three-quarters of the rapist are people who have been drinking heavily. now you think this substantially underreported and you have learned of others who have suffered from this and who hadn't talked about it. >> yeah, and like what joie was saying, rape is not a knew problem. it's not that it's new. it's that we are finally connecting and have the language to speak out about it. social media has given us an entirely new platform to connect with survivors across the country. >> and beyond that there is such a shame in coming forward. it couldn't have happened to you or at a place as safe as carolina or any other scho
explains politics and the environment are slowing down harbor point development. >> reporter: baltimore's waterfront is a local treasure. >> it's great. >> we love it. >> beautiful. >> reporter: and now harbor point is coming. >> last time didn't hurt. >> reporter: high expectations now center on 19 acres. this wjz archive vehicle shows harbor point prior to the demolition of a chromium processing plant that required a multi million dollars clean up. the property valued at $10 million is expected to multiply to $1.8 billion when the project is completed. the government shutdown and air quality has delayed the start. still there's no less enthusiasm for the project. >> some of the environment issues around it, we should make light of that. but nevertheless it is an opportunity for the city to reclaim some of its lost land. >> by having headquarters, land use development these are all going to be opportunity for the city to generate tax revenue some time down the road. >> reporter: a public meeting to review the environment safeguards are scheduled november 18th. now back to you. >> the
-friendly environment and good for the user. >> sure. >> as to my colleague said here, the consumer has to be identified for the first stem when they come into the web site. right now it's very general. of you take acknowledge average consumer and ask elementary, basic questions, you separate that user long a process of user interface, by the time they get to the third page, you isolated the information they're looking for. right now it's congested. you lose your way in the process. to your other question about servers, definitely would inacross the server capable, spread it out. there is a phase that needs to happen that hasn't happened, of testing different load balances of between 200,000 people and two million people at the same time. it hasn't been done. once you do that you can at least secure the web site is not going to crash when it's important for the user to actually navigate through it. >> that's assuming that the people want to go on to the site and try it out. once burnt they might be more than twice shy on that. >> yes. exactly. the use irright now is in a stage where they're not sure wha
's precisely what you should be buying on the sluggish environment. they can increase sales regardless of the weakness in the economy and they buy whole baskets of stocks in the s&p 500 because they know the stocks will top the performance of anything else out there. i know the pattern seems ridiculously easy to game. things are sluggish so the fed will stay friendly so stay in stocks, but it is true that there's still some shock value to hearing how poorly things are really doing, especially when we hear more about upside surprises than downside ones from the companies themselves. however, that's just the way it's been and it will continue to be and it's why i keep urging you to stay in stocks, even after the off the charts segment with the fibonacci queen. i am telling you, you have to be able to book some profits. read my lips, do some selling. get ready for the next washington engendered swoon. they never fail to arrive on time. here's the bottom line, the pattern worked again. many people want to own stocks because they like that the fed has squelched the bond competition and then
environment might not be normal midterm environment at all and every member of coping, democrat, republican needs to watch out because running on anti-washington platform could be a big winner no matter who the incumbent is, no matter who the challenger is. >> if you add up the numbers, there are more republicans holding seats right now. so technically that could be more troublesome for republicans. chris. >> i would add, andrea, i think we always focus on the general election because that's what we're talking about, the battle for control and the majority. but mark has got it exactly right. i would say if you're an incumbent, saichl safely democratic or republican seat, if you're an incumbent and someone marginally credible files against you, you need to pay much more attention if these poll numbers are to be believed and i think they are because we've seen lots of data like this. you need to pay more attention. being in washington is already essentially grounds for firing at this point in the eyes of many voters. i think yes the general election, many primaries, a busy primary season if t
replanted has to adjust to its new environment. that weakens the plants. it is called planting shock. it depends how big the shock is. when it goes into the ground weekend, the likelihood it will survive the shock is even lower. the ground is too tough, uneven, and full of rocks and roots. no easy job for the beginners. i evening, 150 saplings are left unplanted. evening, one hundred 50 saplings are left unplanted. the kitchen crew is waiting. all organic. here another four days after their good deed for the forest. [soft exotic flute music] ♪ captioning and audio description provided by the u.s. department of education. >> bokara: i'm bokara legendre. join me and my guests--scholars and scientists, spiritual teachers and philosophers-- as we explore the boundaries of religion and metaphysics, of science and spirituality. join me and some really fascinating people as we try to figure out what life's all about and how it can have meaning for each one of us.
interest to shape an environment that encourages good lenders to get the quality products to credit where the families. unfortunately, as you know better than anyone, and as dave talked about, one of the major obstacles that's blocking a full housing recovery is regulatory uncertainty. and i understand, having been a lender i can't imagine what it's like sitting at your desk back in your home state as you've watched the federal government respond to the crisis. we've taken a lot of steps that were, in my view, necessary to restore confidence and ensure that many of the bad practices that caused the mess were eliminated. one of the outcomes is that too often the rules of the road were not clear enough, and that led to a tightening of credit. according to the federal reserve from 2007-2012, mortgage lending to borrowers with credit scores over 780 fell by a third. goes to those with scores between 620 and 680 fell by 90%. there are a lot of qualified buyers out there who are being rejected. so my colleagues and i have been working with a wide variety of stakeholders, including many of you,
to that, in order for this to change the environment, make our own environment, we have to change the political environment as well. which means attract many more women to public service, elective office as well as appointive. >> doesn't it also mean, i think a lot of women feel on some level that our rights are being rolled back. we were having a conversation about access to birth control. access to abortion. we had two very disruptive, destructive decisions this week from the d.c. circuit court on birth control. then in texas. i'd love to get your reaction on those two cases. because, again, i think all of the things you're talking about, women can't even get to the point where they're able to participate in the economy in that way when they can't even control their own bodies. >> the respect for women, for their judgment, for their role in the workplace, is really all of one piece. affordable care act, no longer will being a woman be a pre-existing medical condition. after much attack the president and those of us who advanced the bill, the law, supported a woman's reproductive
. the security environment is changing. our military services which have spent much of the past decade relearning the lessons of counterinsurgency and expanding upon them are trying to figure out what they should be 5, 10, 20 years from now. the strategy side is just half of it. after a decade in which military funds were all but limitless, budgets are down again. there has been a buildup in which we did not recapitalize our arsenal. the u.s. has emerged from a decade of war with fewer aircraft, fewer ships, thousands of combat vehicles now abandoned in foreign lands. instead of getting larger, our military has become smaller, older and more expensive. no longer can the military do it all. advancing our national ambitions with our defense budget requires serious prioritization or perhaps innovation. do we sacrifice near-term capacity to build long-term capability? do we rely on allies and partners to a degree once thought unimaginable? during his last few months in office, robert gates who led the way in making the first round of cuts was known to say, tell me what we are not going to do anymore.
in this new, tough, dynamic environment, and indiecom is helping mortgage companies do just that. our quality control solutions mitigate risk, adopt management solutions, enhance efficiencies, our mortgage learning solutions developed through the acquisition of mortgage-u helps manage clients, and our sourcing solutions create -- [inaudible] variable cost models for firms of all sizes. these four pillars are the cornerstones of a business model that delivers relevant solutions to the mortgage industry. our guest this morning is no stranger to the financial services field. many people within the mortgage with industry look at lou for guy dance and insight into the marketplace today. he serves as chairman and president of his company, an adviser and manager of private investments, and he is the founder and chairman of -- [inaudible] partners management llc and its investment management companies focused on financial service opportunities. he previously was a prime originator and founder of hyperion partners. regarded as an expert, an innovator in both the mortgage and capital markets, he has se
justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see own adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question and answer sessi
in our first panel, business creating a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing eve
'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. that's a trend we can all get behind. we don't have time for stuff like laundry. we're too busy having fun. we get everything perfectly clean by tossing one of these in the wash. and that's it. i wanted to do that. oh, come on. eh, that's my favorite part. really? that's our tide. what'sours? see who does good work and compare costs. it doesn't usually work that way with health care. but with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that helps me, and my guys, make better decisions. i don't like guesses with my business, and definitely not with our health. innovations that work for you. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. connell: obama administration teaming up with business leaders to track foreign investments here to the united states. dagen: peter barnes in washington, d.c., with much more. peter: hey, dagen and connell. demonstration is bringing out the big guns this event. president obama will be speaking at this group later today. 1200
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